Category Archives: health

HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW ABOUT BITTER LEAF?


Bitter Leaf also known as (Veronia Amygdalina)

In scientific parlance is an aborigine of Africa. It can be cooked, juiced or chewed raw.

Regular consumption of this vegetable helps to regulate blood cholesterol levels which is a risk factor for heart attack and stroke.

Bitter leaf is rich in proteins, vitamins, and minerals. Due to the presence of nutrients especially Beta Carotene,

It controls the synthesis of female sex hormones. This allows women to stay younger and healthy for a longer duration of time.

Bitter leaf has been shown to significantly lower blood sugar levels It does not only reduce blood sugar, it also helps to repair the pancreas.

The plant has been widely used and recognised for its efficacy in preventing malaria. Drinking the juice alone is an antidote for malaria.

Consumption of the plant is helpful in increasing milk production in breast feeding mothers. It increases appetite in anorexia (loss of appetite).

It is also useful in treating sleeplessness(insomnia) and boosting immune function. It can be utilised in the management of coughs, helminthiasis (worm infestations) constipation ,and as fertility inducers.

There are strong revelations that bitter leaf if incorporated in the diet can slow cancer growth and even kill cancer cells.

It’s worth sharing or not? Forward then as you’ve received to those you care for.

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5 things your partner’s penis can reveal about his health


Just the way you notice some changes in the way your vagina feels or the pains during sex, it’s the same with your partner’s dick.

The curves, lumps, and bumps can be signs of health issues and if you notice any of these on your partner, advice him to go see a doctor before it gets worse.

Below are some signs to look out for on your partner’s dick.

1. When erect, his dick has a curve

This is a form of a relatively common condition called Peyronie’s disease, which is caused by a buildup of scar tissue. Some doctors aren’t sure why some men develop a Peyronie’s curve, but this can also occur from a penile injury while playing sports.

2. Lump found under the skin

Normally, guys feel a hardness and this is sometimes due to the blood vessel. Also, a blocked lymph gland can be to blame or for some men, it is often a scar tissue from Peyronie’s. However, the odds are the lump is harmless, and your man may not need to address it at all. But if it’s caused by scar tissue, and there’s a significant amount affecting intercourse, advice him to see the doctor.

3. One or more tiny bumps

A lot of things can cause tiny bumps. However, it could be a pimple, which is known as ‘pearly penile papules’ and are just tiny bumps. Cysts are also common, and like penile papules, generally not a big deal. But some bumps are a bigger deal. STI caused by certain types of HPV is one possibility. If this is the case, you should see your doctor.

4. Having urination troubles

Having blood in his urine is one pee problem that definitely needs attention. Can be cancer-related and he should do a scan immediately. Other pee issues like bladder retention, are usually the result of a benign enlarged prostate. You can get this checked with an exam and a blood test.

5. Lump in his testicles

It’s not uncommon for a guy to detect a lump, and luckily, it’s usually something harmless. But if your guy feels a lump and pain, it could be an infection, and he’ll need antibiotics to clear it up. However, There is another type of lump called testicular torsion when the cord that supplies blood to the testes has become twisted and cut off. And this mostly caused by an injury, symptoms come on quick and may be accompanied by fever, nausea, scrotal swelling, and abdominal pain. Testicular torsion is a medical emergency. If this sounds like something your partner may have, get him to the emergency ward at once.

By Sarah Babs

8 healthy skin habits that every lady in her 20s need to establish


Many of us are guilty of skin care mistakes that could spell doom. Of those many of us are guilty of include failing to wash out makeup before bed or skipping sunscreen in our routine.

While you may be young and wrinkle free now, taking proper care of your skin at a young age is what will ensure that you stay wrinkle free even as you get older.

Rather than struggle to have to have flawless skin later in life, it is best to incorporate proper skin care habits as early as your 20s. Simply put, you take care of your skin and it will take care of you.

Here are eight healthy habits that you need in your life for younger skin in the years to come.

1. Simplify your routine

Sometimes we tend to go overboard with our skin care products in our quest for flawless skin. Having a lot of products in your cabinet however does not guarantee better skin. Instead, stick to a few products that actually work for you. Using too many different products means that you are mixing up too many chemicals, fragrances and ingredients which is not the best thing for your skin. A product takes about six weeks before you can start seeing results so give it time to work before you go buy another one.

2. Cleanse correctly

Invest in a good cleanser that cleans your face without taking away your skin’s natural oils. A good cleanser should be of neutral pH, gentle and a non-soap. When washing your face, rub it in circular motions so as to encourage blood flow leaving you with a healthy glow.

3. Use a mild exfoliant

Since we shed about 50 million skin cells per day, it is important to scrub them away by exfoliating. Stay away from face scrubs that are too abrasive as they cause your face to discolor or even cause scarring. Pick a mild, inexpensive product from your local beauty shop and exfoliate about two times a week.

4. Moisturize

Moisturizing is a critical part of keeping your skin young. Just because you have oily skin does not mean you should skip your moisturizer. Instead, get a light lotion or a serum and skip the heavy cream-based ones. For normal or dry skin, get a facial oil or cream.

5. Cover up

The sun is not very kind to your skin and 90 percent of aging is triggered by unprotected exposure to the sun. Frequent tanning can also cause you to have a deadly skin cancer known as melanoma. This means that you need to cover up your skin in sunscreen and not just at the beach or pool, but everywhere else. To simplify your skin care routine, invest in a moisturizer that has at least an SPF of 30.

6. Stop picking

Popping your pimples can actually get addictive and hard stop but it is one really unhealthy habit for your skin. It can lead to scarring, dark marks and even red marks on your face. Popping your pimples can also lead to epidermal inclusion cysts, a condition where you get round lumps on the skin that might need surgical removal.

7. Catch more sleep

One of the causes of accelerated aging is lack of sufficient sleep. While you are taking care of your body on the outside, you also have to allow it to work from the inside out. Maximizing your sleep gives your skin a chance to recover from all the sun damage on your skin.

8. Eat more whole foods

The skin is the largest organ in your body and what you eat will definitely reflect on your skin. It is important to consume Omega-3 as they will reduce the inflammatory chemicals that cause your skin and heart to age. Foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids include flaxseed oil, nuts, hemp oil, tuna and salmon. It is also important to reduce your intake of processed foods which can lead to breakouts.

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By ZTF

MESSAGE FROM LAGOS STATE UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITAL (LUTH)


Please let your wife know about this, this is a serious caution from medical practitioners message from Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) to all female beings be it infant, baby girl, ladies, mothers. Cancer of the vagina is all over, please avoid washing your vagina with soap, wash with only water, there is a particular chemical in soap generally that is very dangerous and possibly causes cancer of the vagina, cases of cancer of the vagina is all over most of the general hospitals so be aware of this important message. If you have feelings for others kindly pass this message to someone that are important to you.

56 Girls died because of using Whisper, Stay free.
Don’t use one single pad for the whole day because of the chemical used in ultra napkins which converts liquid into Gel. It causes Cancer in Bladder & Uterus.

So please try to use cotton made Pads. And if you are using ultra Pads, Please change it within five hours per day at least. If the time is prolonged the blood becomes green and the fungus formed gets inside The uterus and body.

  • Please don’t feel shy to forward this message to all girls, and even boys so that they can share it with their wives and friends whom they care for.

AIMS “Kick Off “Breast Cancer”.

  • Nurse you’re baby.
  • Wash you’re Bra daily.
  • Avoid black Bra in summer
  • Do not wear a Bra while sleeping.
  • Do not wear an under wire Bra very often.
  • Always cover you’re chest completely by you’re dupatta Or scarf when you are under the sun.
  • Use a deodorant not an anti antiperspirant.

This is a Public Service Message From Tata Cancer Hospital.

Pass it to all the ladies you care for without hesitating. Awareness is important..

I Care For You.

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4 Proven Health Benefits Of Drinking Soy Milk


Soy milk is mostly known for being the replacement drink for lactose-intolerant people. And it is also constantly under the radar for supposedly affecting sperm quality in men, but this lacks solid proof. What’s important about soy milk is that it can treat conditions like hypertension, diabetes, breast cancer, cardiac issues, obesity, and more! Know how it affects men and women differently and how much of soy milk is the right amount in your daily diet.

Soy milk, a beverage made solely from soybeans and which is completely dairy-free, is the preferred choice for vegans and those who are lactose intolerant. But that’s not the only reason you should drink it! Soy milk is loaded with wholesome nutrients that give you multiple health benefits, provided you’re not allergic to soy.

Let’s take a look at some of the nutritional benefits of soy milk (about 240 ml; plain flavor) and exactly how they help:

Health Benefits Of Soy Milk

1. Lowers Blood Pressure And Cures Hypertension

Soy milk treats hypertension by lowering both systolic and diastolic blood pressure.2 Drinking soy milk every day has been seen to induce the urinary excretion of a particular flavonoid, which is what reduces blood pressure.

Soy milk also helps diabetics who face kidney-related problems (nephropathy) with better blood pressure control.4 It contains a good amount of polyphenols, which might increase the bioavailability of nitric oxide and thus influence blood pressure levels.

2. Treats Type 2 Diabetes

With its high calcium and low fat content, soy milk is the perfect non-dairy option for your diabetic meal plan. It helps diabetics by lowering cholesterol and preventing cardiovascular issues. Its effect on lipid levels is shown to be beneficial in the treatment of diabetes. However, remember to drink soy milk in moderation as excess protein and carbs can mess up your diet plan.

3. Accelerates Weight Loss

The fiber in soy milk has a considerable effect on the body mass index, LDL cholesterol levels, and body weight, which is useful in the treatment of obesity, hypertension, and excess lipid levels.7 When combined with a low-fat diet, the soy proteins reduce weight but retain muscle mass in obese individuals.

4. Improves Cardiovascular Health

According to the USFDA, soy is one of the products that lowers cholesterol levels in the body and prevents heart-related diseases. Soy products like soy milk improve plasma lipid levels and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, especially in those with high cholesterol. The high levels of polyunsaturated fats, vitamins, fiber, and minerals and low saturated fats also assist in keeping your heart healthy.

Your body takes care of the blood flow through vascular reactivity, which alters the build of the blood vessels as and when required. Soy milk improves this reactivity and keeps your heart strong.

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Key malaria parasite findings could lead to new treatments


Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified how the malaria parasite gets into and out of red blood cells, and chemical compounds that block the process. The findings could lead to desperately needed new drugs for the deadly mosquito-borne disease.

Sebastian Nasamu, an MD/PhD student at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, battled successive bouts of malaria as a child growing up in Ghana. He survived ­– but decided long ago to commit himself to eradicating the disease. The possibility that his work could lead to a treatment is the reason he goes to the lab every day.

The pursuit has led the School of Medicine’s Nasamu, Daniel Goldberg, MD, PhD, and colleagues to the identification of two crucial enzymes in the malaria parasite’s arsenal: One helps the microbe invade red blood cells; the other aids the parasite’s escape from the cells so it can move on to infect other cells.

Further, the researchers showed that a drug that cures malaria in mice works via one of these enzymes. The findings – published Oct. 27 in the journal Science – suggest that targeting such enzymes could lead to new kinds of anti-malarial drugs, which are urgently needed as resistance to current drugs continues to spread.

“We identified enzymes that appear to be central for invading and bursting out of red blood cells, and showed that they are targets of anti-malarial inhibitors,” said senior author Goldberg, the David M. and Paula L. Kipnis Distinguished Professor of Medicine.

An estimated 212 million people contracted malaria in 2015, and more than 400,000 – mostly children under age 5 ­– died of it. The disease is spread by the bite of a blood-sucking mosquito. Parasites in the mosquito’s saliva slip into a person’s bloodstream and destroy red blood cells.

“When I was growing up I had malaria maybe 30 times, two or three times a year,” recalled Nasamu, the study’s first author. “You get sick, your mom goes to the drug store, buys a couple of pills, you take them. With luck, within three days you’re feeling better, and within a week you’re back up and can go to school.”

As a child, Nasamu probably was treated with chloroquine. Today, so many malaria parasites are resistant to chloroquine that the drug is no longer useful in Africa. Instead, the drug of choice is artemisinin.

“There is a massive international effort to develop new anti-malarials, but all the top prospects are based on artemisinin, and now resistance to artemisinin is spreading,” said Goldberg, who is also a professor of molecular microbiology. “If artemisinin fails, there’s not much else in the pipeline.”

In an effort to find new drugs to battle the deadly disease, Goldberg, Nasamu and colleagues have been working their way through a group of 10 parasite enzymes known as plasmepsins, trying to find the ones the parasite relies on to cause disease.

They finally hit pay dirt with plasmepsins IX and X. By inactivating the genes for the two enzymes, they found that the enzymes are indispensable in getting the parasites into and out of red blood cells.

The parasites without plasmepsin X were able to invade red blood cells and multiply inside them, but then found themselves trapped. The parasites that lacked plasmepsin IX had the opposite problem: They burst out from red blood cells but were unable to penetrate the next round of cells.

These were the enzymes the researchers had been looking for. Invading and exiting red blood cells are crucial steps in the life cycle of the malaria parasite. A drug that blocks this step would stop the parasite in its tracks.

Goldberg, Nasamu and colleagues screened compounds known to work on enzymes similar to plasmepsins in search of ones that could inhibit plasmepsin IX or X. They found three that prevent the parasite from multiplying, including one that cured malaria in mice. These compounds had been developed by the Center for World Health and Medicine at Saint Louis University. But nobody knew which enzymes the compounds targeted.

The researchers exposed malaria parasites to each compound and then allowed the microbes to infect red blood cells. Parasites treated with the compounds behaved just like parasites that lacked plasmepsin X: They wriggled impotently inside red blood cells, unable to get out. Further experiments confirmed that the three compounds target plasmepsin X.

Even though one of the compounds has proven effective in mice, developing it as a potential anti-malarial drug for people probably will require some tweaking to its chemical structure to maximize safety and effectiveness. But knowing that it targets plasmepsin X should speed that process up considerably, the researchers said.

“If you don’t know what the target is and you’re trying to make a better drug, all you can do is try changing the molecule bit by bit, randomly, and hope it works,” Goldberg said. “If you know what the target is, and you know how the compound interacts with the enzyme, you can do a much smarter job of choosing chemical modifications.”

This compound is particularly appealing because parasites seem to have difficulty acquiring resistance to it.

“People have tried to induce resistance to this compound in the laboratory, and no one has been able to do it,” Goldberg said. “That doesn’t mean it can’t happen, but it’s a good sign.”

That possibility drives Nasamu.

“I would like to be able to contribute to the eradication of this disease because the people who suffer the most are the people I come from,” Nasamu said. “I easily could have died of this before I was 5. But instead, I am here”.

Source: Pocket News

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified how the malaria parasite gets into and out of red blood cells, and chemical compounds that block the process. The findings could lead to desperately needed new drugs for the deadly mosquito-borne disease.

Sebastian Nasamu, an MD/PhD student at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, battled successive bouts of malaria as a child growing up in Ghana. He survived ­– but decided long ago to commit himself to eradicating the disease. The possibility that his work could lead to a treatment is the reason he goes to the lab every day.

The pursuit has led the School of Medicine’s Nasamu, Daniel Goldberg, MD, PhD, and colleagues to the identification of two crucial enzymes in the malaria parasite’s arsenal: One helps the microbe invade red blood cells; the other aids the parasite’s escape from the cells so it can move on to infect other cells.

Further, the researchers showed that a drug that cures malaria in mice works via one of these enzymes. The findings – published Oct. 27 in the journal Science – suggest that targeting such enzymes could lead to new kinds of anti-malarial drugs, which are urgently needed as resistance to current drugs continues to spread.

“We identified enzymes that appear to be central for invading and bursting out of red blood cells, and showed that they are targets of anti-malarial inhibitors,” said senior author Goldberg, the David M. and Paula L. Kipnis Distinguished Professor of Medicine.

An estimated 212 million people contracted malaria in 2015, and more than 400,000 – mostly children under age 5 ­– died of it. The disease is spread by the bite of a blood-sucking mosquito. Parasites in the mosquito’s saliva slip into a person’s bloodstream and destroy red blood cells.

“When I was growing up I had malaria maybe 30 times, two or three times a year,” recalled Nasamu, the study’s first author. “You get sick, your mom goes to the drug store, buys a couple of pills, you take them. With luck, within three days you’re feeling better, and within a week you’re back up and can go to school.”

As a child, Nasamu probably was treated with chloroquine. Today, so many malaria parasites are resistant to chloroquine that the drug is no longer useful in Africa. Instead, the drug of choice is artemisinin.

“There is a massive international effort to develop new anti-malarials, but all the top prospects are based on artemisinin, and now resistance to artemisinin is spreading,” said Goldberg, who is also a professor of molecular microbiology. “If artemisinin fails, there’s not much else in the pipeline.”

In an effort to find new drugs to battle the deadly disease, Goldberg, Nasamu and colleagues have been working their way through a group of 10 parasite enzymes known as plasmepsins, trying to find the ones the parasite relies on to cause disease.

They finally hit pay dirt with plasmepsins IX and X. By inactivating the genes for the two enzymes, they found that the enzymes are indispensable in getting the parasites into and out of red blood cells.

The parasites without plasmepsin X were able to invade red blood cells and multiply inside them, but then found themselves trapped. The parasites that lacked plasmepsin IX had the opposite problem: They burst out from red blood cells but were unable to penetrate the next round of cells.

These were the enzymes the researchers had been looking for. Invading and exiting red blood cells are crucial steps in the life cycle of the malaria parasite. A drug that blocks this step would stop the parasite in its tracks.

Goldberg, Nasamu and colleagues screened compounds known to work on enzymes similar to plasmepsins in search of ones that could inhibit plasmepsin IX or X. They found three that prevent the parasite from multiplying, including one that cured malaria in mice. These compounds had been developed by the Center for World Health and Medicine at Saint Louis University. But nobody knew which enzymes the compounds targeted.

The researchers exposed malaria parasites to each compound and then allowed the microbes to infect red blood cells. Parasites treated with the compounds behaved just like parasites that lacked plasmepsin X: They wriggled impotently inside red blood cells, unable to get out. Further experiments confirmed that the three compounds target plasmepsin X.

Even though one of the compounds has proven effective in mice, developing it as a potential anti-malarial drug for people probably will require some tweaking to its chemical structure to maximize safety and effectiveness. But knowing that it targets plasmepsin X should speed that process up considerably, the researchers said.

“If you don’t know what the target is and you’re trying to make a better drug, all you can do is try changing the molecule bit by bit, randomly, and hope it works,” Goldberg said. “If you know what the target is, and you know how the compound interacts with the enzyme, you can do a much smarter job of choosing chemical modifications.”

This compound is particularly appealing because parasites seem to have difficulty acquiring resistance to it.

“People have tried to induce resistance to this compound in the laboratory, and no one has been able to do it,” Goldberg said. “That doesn’t mean it can’t happen, but it’s a good sign.”

That possibility drives Nasamu.

“I would like to be able to contribute to the eradication of this disease because the people who suffer the most are the people I come from,” Nasamu said. “I easily could have died of this before I was 5. But instead, I am here”.

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Source: Pocket News

Daily Recipe: Tomato Burrata Bites


Today, I would like to introduce a wonderful recipe called Tomato Burrata Bites.

No-cook finger food at its finest! Sweet Campari tomatoes are stuffed with rich, creamy burrata and finished with fresh basil.

Ingredients:

16 Campari tomatoes

Flaky sea salt and freshly ground pepper

1 ball (8 ounces) burrata cheese

Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling

Small fresh basil leaves, for serving

Directions:

Trim the base of each tomato so they sit flat. Using a serrated knife, slice off top 1/4 inch of each tomato. Scoop out seeds and pulp, then place hollowed-out shells upside-down on a paper-towel-lined plate or baking sheet to drain, about 5 minutes.

Turn tomatoes upright, and season with salt. Open burrata and pour creamy interior into a bowl. Chop firm exterior into 1/2-inch pieces, then stuff one piece in the bottom of each tomato. Divide creamy center among tomatoes (about 1 teaspoon each). Drizzle tomatoes with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and garnish with basil. Serve immediately.

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By Socool