FG begins preparation of 2016 budget


SEPTEMBER 23, 2015 : IFEANYI ONUBA
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President Muhammadu Buhari
The Federal Government on Tuesday began the
process of the preparation of the 2016 budget
for the country.
The fiscal document for 2016 will be based on
six policy thrusts and it is aimed at stimulating
growth and reducing the level of poverty in the
economy.
The policy thrust are economic and social
development, infrastructure, governance,
environment, as well as state and regional
development.
Under each pillar, broad policy objectives have
been identified along the Key Performance
Indicators, targets and programmes.
Addressing stakeholders at the validation
workshop on the policy thrust of the 2016-2020
Medium Term Strategic Plan, the Secretary,
National Planning Commission, Mr. Bassey
Akpanyadung, stated that budgeting would no
longer be business as usual.
He said the policy thrust of the government
must be consistent with the zero-based
budgeting system, which will come into effect
next year.
With this development, Akpanyadung said the
leadership of the respective Ministries,
Department and Agencies of governments would
need to build their capacities in the areas of
planning, research and statistics.
He said the monitoring and evaluation system
would be strengthened with emphasis on
physical monitoring of projects, adding that the
envelop system of budgeting would no longer be
used in the country’s budgeting process.
The envelop system was introduced by the
Federal Government in 2003 and works by
providing each MDA with a maximum amount for
its capital and recurrent needs for the fiscal
year.
Under the system, the MDAs were left with
money as they wished.
Akpanyadung said, “A comprehensive project
selection criteria will be adopted for admitting
projects into the plan. The principles that will
guide project selection include impact on
employment and welfare, inter-linkages with
other sectors and projects, and alignment with
the post-2015 development agenda.
“The representatives of the MDAs are, therefore,
urged to be guided by these principles in
identifying their projects and programmes.
“The envelop system will no longer be used in
annual budgeting process of the country.”
Explaining the policy objective of the
government, Akpanyadung said it would include,
among others, macroeconomic stability and
efficient resources management, real sector
development, and achieving holistic and
sustainable reform in the education sector.
Others are achieving qualitative and affordable
health care, infrastructure development,
sustainable environment and land use, security
sector governance, good governance, rule of law
and improving efficiency in the public service.
The NPC secretary said under the new
arrangement, the MDAs were expected to
provide well-costed programmes and projects for
enhanced delivery of plans.
Giving a breakdown of the key priority areas, he
said for the economic sector, the focus would be
to reform the oil and gas sector, real sector,
agriculture sector, tourism and creative
industries’ development, strengthening of public
financial management as well as national
planning and statistical system.
For social development, Akpanyadung said the
emphasis was to develop education
infrastructure and capacity building of technical
staff, pro-poor health care services and
infrastructure development, promotion of grass
roots sports and social protection initiatives.
In the area of infrastructure development, he
said that the government would improve
electricity generation, transmission and
distribution, increase gas supply pipelines,
rehabilitate roads as well as embark on railway
network expansion and modernisation.

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Illegal flights: British firm pays N11m fine to NCAA


SEPTEMBER 23, 2015 : OYETUNJI ABIOYE
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| credits: thentpteam.com
The Nigerian Civil Aviation

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Authority has imposed
a fine of N11m on a British firm, Gama Aviation,
for allegedly flying its Bombardier Global Express
plane into and within Nigeria illegally.
The affected company has consequently paid
N7m fine to the NCAA and another $20,000
(N3.9m) to the Nigeria Airspace Management
Agency.
Following the payment of the fines, the Nigerian
aviation regulator on Tuesday said it had
released the aircraft to leave the country for the
United Kingdom.
The NCAA had on Monday said it impounded the
Bombardier jet for allegedly carrying out illegal
flights in the country.
The Acting General Manager, Public Affairs,
NCAA, Mr. Sam Adurogboye, said following the
agency’s investigation of the illegal operation of
the firm, a letter of sanction was written to the
operator into the aircraft as regards the
sanctions imposed on it.
The NCAA letter read, “In the light of the above,
you are hereby sanctioned in accordance with
the provisions of section 1 .3.3A and Section B
of the Nigerian Civil Aviation Regulations (NCAR)
2009 and you are required to pay within seven
days on the date of receiving this letter the sum
of N7m, being the total civil penalty for the
above violation.”
Adurogboye said in line with the NCAR, the
aircraft was released after paying the necessary
fine.
He recalled that the plane had been on ground at
the Nnamdi Azikiwe Airport Abuja since
September 10 when it landed in the country.
The NCAA spokesman hinted that the second
aircraft, an Embraer 135 with registration marks
XA-MHA, had not been released because the
owners had not paid the fine imposed on it for
illegally operating in the Nigerian airspace.
He stated that the aircraft was still on ground at
the Abuja airport.
On the security implication of the infractions by
the two aircraft, Adurogboye said that the NCAA
was working closely with other security agencies
at the airport.
“There is no airspace that is immune to violation.
We normally have security meetings where all
the agencies discuss security matters. We need
NAMA and other agencies to check the violation
of the airspace,” Adurogboye added.

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Adopting New Approach To Oil Theft Combat


SEPTEMBER 20, 2015 : PUNCH EDITORIAL
BOARD
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Security operatives at the scene of Saturday’s
pipeline fire in Arepo, Ogun State… on Sunday.
Inset: Ogun State Governor Ibikunle Amosun
(second right) and Commissioner of Police, Mr.
Ikemefuna Okoye (right), during the governor’s
visit to the site.
THE killing of seven operatives of the
Department of State Services last week, by oil
pipeline vandals in Ikorodu, a suburb of Lagos,
and an earlier incident in Arepo, a village in
Ogun State, where nine policemen were
murdered in 2014 by the same group, once more
draw our attention to a criminality the
government often treats with kid gloves.
If these security operatives could be so
mindlessly killed in these two rural communities
far away from the Niger Delta – the heart of this
criminality – the level of pipeline vandalism in
the oil-producing communities and the extent
the bandits can go to have their way could be
better appreciated.
Countervailing their banditry was what the
Nigerian Navy displayed recently in Rivers State,
when it destroyed some illegal bunkering and
refining sites. A total of 145,000 litres of crude
oil was set ablaze. The billowing smoke from
the scene of the incident, acres of forest land
laid waste by accompanying oil spill and the
fleeing thieves in speed boats along the creeks,
aerially monitored by a military helicopter,
created a vivid panorama of a country in deep
economic and security mess.
The Commander of the operation, Shuwa
Mohammed, told journalists, “While setting the
refinery ablaze, four out of the fleeing oil
thieves came back and offered us a bribe of
N600, 000 to leave the refinery. The four
suspects were arrested and will be handed over
to the Nigerian Security and Civil Defence Corps
for investigation and prosecution.” There are
33,000 creeks in the oil-rich Niger Delta, which
harbour oil vandals and militants.
Oil theft in Nigeria is a big business with
international roots. According to Chatham
House, a United Kingdom-based think-tank,
illegal bunkering of Nigerian crude oil probably
started in the late 1970s or early 1980s, when
the country was under military rule. In most
versions of the story, some top army and navy
officers began stealing oil – or allowing others
to steal it – to enrich themselves and maintain
political stability. Much of West African piracy
takes place within territorial waters, not the high
seas, as in the Indian Ocean.
The foreigners involved invade our territorial
waters with large vessels and tanks. They are so
daring that they approach top military
commanders in the region to solicit their
cooperation with bribes. This explains why
Chatham House said, “Nigerian crude oil is
being stolen on an industrial scale. Proceeds are
laundered through the world’s financial centres.”
Buhari claimed that even up to June 10, a week
after he had assumed office, government
functionaries were still illegally lifting about
250,000 barrels of crude oil daily. Oil industry
watchdog, Nigeria Extractive Industries
Transparency Initiative, said last month that its
audit report showed that 160 million barrels of
the country’s crude oil valued at $13.7 billion
was stolen in four years (2009 -2012), going by
the shadowy record of just three oil companies
it inspected.
Sanitising the system will require a
radical policy and implementation strategies.
Experts say common pipeline security measures
include aerial surveillance, installation of
pipeline warning boards/markers, deployment of
security personnel, and conducting awareness
campaigns to educate inhabitants and workers
along the pipeline route. Advanced
telecommunication systems and leak detection
systems are also widely used to improve the
monitoring and remote control of pipelines. But
past efforts yielded little or no result on account
of corruption. A Wall Street Journal report says
Nigeria bought Israeli drones meant to survey
pipelines but ended up without spare parts,
cameras or engines. A German-manufactured
frigate for sea patrols is also out of order.
This haemorrhaging of the economy has thrived
because the pipeline vandals or “small thieves”
are never prosecuted let alone unmasking the
barons who mastermind shipment of stolen
crude abroad. It is only by reversing this ugly
trend that the campaign will take root or endure.
Apart from the financial losses the country
incurs from the activities of these rogue
merchants of our oil, the attendant health
hazards are beyond belief. Ogoni’s case is a
notorious example. A report of United Nations
Environmental Programme in 2011 discovered
that some water wells – source of drinking
water for many families there – contain
benzene, a carcinogen or cancer causing agent.
This is the time to act firmly. It is said that oil
theft will increase as soon as oil prices spike.
As the Buhari administration blocks financial
leakages amid declining oil revenue following
global downturn in the market, the ongoing
renewal of offensive against these oil bandits is
a battle the country can ill-afford to lose. The
President has taken the first right step in
cancelling the N9 billion pipeline protection
contract awarded in curious circumstances to ex-
militants and other groups by the Goodluck
Jonathan administration. Equally apt is Buhari’s
directive to the military to take over that
responsibility, a move the Group Managing
Director of Nigerian National Petroleum
Corporation, Ibe Kachikwu, followed up with a
meeting with the Chief of Defence Staff, Gabriel
Olonisakin, on Tuesday to tidy up the
engagement of the three services – Army, Navy
and Air Force.
But an enduring result can only be achieved by
overhauling the present surveillance system.
More boats for effective patrol of the creeks,
waterways and helicopters for aerial surveillance
and massive deployment of technology can boost
this drive. As a matter of fact, Nigeria cannot
stop crude oil theft without foreign help. It is
reported that US military has trained more than
200 Nigerian naval commandos and installed
coastal radars to track ships. The US Coast
Guard also gave Nigeria a pair of ships. Apart
from adequately equipping the Navy and Air
Force, new technology designed to prevent
pipeline damage from occurring in the first place
by providing advance warning of the events
leading up to an incident should be explored.
This was part of the Nuhu Ribadu-led Petroleum
Revenue Task Force report in 2012. Buhari
should take a look at the report.

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Refineries: Buhari, Kachikwu on the wrong path


SEPTEMBER 21, 2015 : PUNCH EDITORIAL
BOARD
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A section of the Port Harcourt Refinery
CONFRONTED with crumbling state-owned
refineries, President Muhammadu Buhari and
head of the state oil company, Ibe Kachikwu,
have opted for retrogression. By stubbornly
insisting on holding on to, and throwing more
public money at the plants, they have set out on
a familiar, treacherous road that headlined the
failure of their predecessors to provide locally-
refined petroleum products for three decades.
Privatisation however remains the one sure and
tested route to efficiency in the downstream
sector of our oil and gas industry.
Kachikwu disappointed investors when he
announced last week that the Nigerian National
Petroleum Corporation would not sell, but “will
remodel” its four refineries by creating “new
modules”, building new ones beside them and
infusing new commercial practices, effectively
dashing hopes that the new government’s
promise of change would see to the transfer of
refineries into private hands.
Many may have been overly optimistic that the
30-year nightmare of massive importation of
refined products, frequent shortages and a
corruption-fuelled subsidy regime would end with
the coming of the Buhari government. Indeed,
the President has never been enthusiastic about
privatisation, persuaded that once corruption and
“indiscipline” are rooted out of the system, the
refineries and other state enterprises will run
efficiently. The appointment of Kachikwu as
group managing director of the NNPC and the
pro-business credentials of Vice-President Yemi
Osinbajo, who chairs the National Council on
Privatisation, were expected to temper Buhari’s
statist instincts.
A noted legal mind and long-time operator in the
oil and gas sector tapped from ExxonMobil, the
world’s largest oil major, Kachikwu has gone the
way of his predecessors who, once appointed,
dumped their advocacy of privatisation to
become apologists for unproductive and
corruption-prone state control of the oil
downstream.
Nigeria is paying an unbearable price for this
monopoly. Massive subsidy payments, most of
them dubious, are made annually on petrol and
kerosene imports despite an average crude oil
production capacity of 2.3 million barrels per
day. Shortages have become a permanent reality.
Yet, experts unanimously agree that the
refineries in their present state are drain pipes.
Kachikwu too admitted that, being 30 to 40 years
old, they were hard to maintain. On a visit to the
Kaduna refinery, he declared that the plants
“cannot take Nigeria anywhere”, noting that three
of Kaduna’s six units had been down and un-
serviced for long. The first of Port Harcourt’s
two refineries was built in 1965, Kaduna in 1980
and Warri in 1978 but upgraded in 1987-89. Ben
Murray-Bruce, a senator, recently likened pouring
more money into them to seeking to rehabilitate
a Mercedes 450 SEL salon car which production
stopped in 1981, instead of the cost-efficient
option of buying a new model. Like the Idika Kalu
Presidential Panel recommended in 2012, the
Senator said the cost of regular Turnaround
Maintenance on the ageing plants “is so high
that it would make better sense to build a new
refinery.”
The PUNCH remains steadfast in its advocacy of
transparent privatisation and the liberalisation of
the downstream oil sector to allow private
enterprise free rein. Rather than use scarce
public funds to build new refineries, we strongly
suggest a robust liberal regime to open the
floodgates to foreign and local investment in
refineries, petrochemical plants, pipelines and
depots. We expect Buhari to translate his pledge
made in Washington, United States, in July, to
break the NNPC into two – one as an investment
vehicle and the other as a truly independent
regulator – into concrete action. The last
Petroleum Minister, Diezani Alison-Madueke, said
in 2013 that getting a replacement for the
decayed facilities “was not possible as they are
obsolete’’ and can hardly produce. Billions of
dollars have been allotted for TAM over the
years and promptly stolen. The last government
said it borrowed $1.6 billion barely three years
ago for TAM in a shadowy deal that barely
delivered 10 per cent capacity utilisation.
The danger in the rush to put the refineries to
optimal use is that they could actually work for a
while, but, shortly after, begin to break down,
requiring even more infusions of cash. Nigerians
have seen this happen in the power sector when
the Olusegun Obasanjo administration gave the
Liyel Imoke-led committee billions of naira to
rehabilitate obsolete power plants, and in the
railways sector where the Chinese have for 20
years been given billions of naira to “rehabilitate”
rail tracks laid between 1898 and 1964! While the
power plants began collapsing one after the
other shortly after they were restarted, a rail
journey from Lagos to Ibadan (147 km) takes
four hours and Lagos to Kano (1,186 km) lasts
28 hours.
Buhari should hearken to the earlier, and wiser,
recommendation of the NNPC and the Kalu panel
and quickly privatise the refineries. He should
initiate a liberal operating regime that, like the
telecoms reform, will energise private capital and
create jobs.
The private sector can get the job done while
the government invests in health care, education,
training, water supply and sanitation, roads and
institution building. Buhari puts faith in his
personal discipline, but should ask himself what
happens after he leaves office. The United
States Government owns none of the 140
refineries in the country that process over 17
million bpd. Without domestic crude oil reserves,
Singapore’s three major refineries with 1.3
million barrels per day, makes the country the
undisputed oil hub in Asia and one of the world’s
top three export refining centres.
Holding on to the refineries is a bad idea and the
government should not throw more money into a
sink hole.

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Restoring sanity to budgeting


SEPTEMBER 23, 2015 : PUNCH EDITORIAL
BOARD
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President Muhammadu Buhari
VICE-PRESIDENT Yemi Osinbajo gave a strong
indication last week that the federal
administration would dump the horrible
budgeting practices of the past 16 years, which
have become a long-standing hurdle to national
development.
Restoring sanity to public financial management
however will require dogged commitment to
produce growth-enhancing fiscal plans and the
elimination of waste and corruption.
Unlike the three previous administrations since
1999, the Muhammadu Buhari administration has
confronted the reality that our current budgeting
system cannot deliver development. According
to Osinbajo, the government will use the Zero-
Budgeting format in preparing the 2016 national
budget in preference to the existing traditional
incremental budgeting or Envelope Budgeting
format that has served indolent, corrupt federal
officials so well, but failed to drive
development.
This is long overdue as repeated calls for a more
efficient budget formulation and implementation
process were ignored by past presidents
Olusegun Obasanjo, Umaru Yar’Adua and
Goodluck Jonathan.
Defined as a summary or plan of the expected
revenues and expenditure for fiscal year, a
government budget sets out revenues, costs,
expenses and cash flows, while expressing
strategic plans and national development
targets.
Development planners broadly identify three
types of government budget as: the operating or
current budget, the capital or investment budget
and cash flow budget. The emphasis is on the
operating (recurrent) and capital outlays.
Traditional budgeting relies mainly on the
incremental format with planning based on
existing income and expenditure, where officials
simply add to the preceding year’s vote on each
line item, making allowance for inflation. This
system may have worked well in the past when
Nigeria had five-year development plans and,
later, three-year rolling plans and budgets were
formulated to meet defined planning targets. The
problem with our budgeting is multifaceted.
First, we have failed to move with the best in
the world, away from the “envelope” system to
zero-based budgeting that according to experts,
“involves evaluating the inputs and outputs for
specific activities as opposed to the traditional
line item format”. Second, national planning has
derailed: there is an absence of commitment to
implement any and achieve specific development
targets. Budgets have become mere ad hoc
spending plans with poor linkages to medium or
long-term national growth objectives beyond the
slogans of politicians. Moreover, our budgeting
has been overtaken by ineptitude, corruption and
a signal lack of professionalism.
Instead of plans that can provide infrastructure,
stimulate production and job creation, we have
consumptive budgets that feed parasitic political
and bureaucratic classes and by the brazen
abuse of the envelope system, sustains a
gigantic system of corruption. That is why
incrementally, “Service wide” vote, for instance,
rose from N301.84 billion in the 2014 budget to
N348.69 billion in 2015. Not tied to specifics,
such outlays easily become “pocket money” for
officials. For the same reason, expenditures on
kitchen equipment, cutlery, presidential villa
gate, computers, printers, cars and generators,
among others, keep on returning to the budget
each year. Since these are items that no sane
person replaces every year, it is obvious that our
envelope system feeds a vast complex of fraud
that encourages officials to generate invoices,
fake contracts and receipts to enjoy the budget
largesse.
Having identified the problem, however, the
government should realise that zero-based
budgeting poses the challenge of high level
professionalism by budget planners and places a
tougher demand on implementation. Replacing
the Planning-Programming-Budgeting System
adopted in the United States in the 1960s to the
1970s, zero-based budgeting demands
that planners do a thorough evaluation of the
costs and benefits of each project and requires
that every expenditure be justified in detail,
helping to identify redundancies or duplications.
Modern budgeting is scientific and Nigeria must
join the train. Never again should the
government return to making budget plans
without tying them to revenue sources. Every
expenditure project should have identifiable
revenue sources. Cuts in in the United Kingdom
and the United States defence budgets are
planned to move into other critical sectors. To
partly fund its new F-35 war planes, for instance,
the Pentagon aims to retire its A-10 Thunderbolt
aircraft fleet.
Planning for projects must include identifying
where the funds will come from.
More crucially, Nigeria needs practical national
plans to which all stakeholders will buy in and
national budgets geared towards meeting
identified growth targets. Malaysia was able to
grow its economy from an agrarian to an
industrialised one within the ambit of national
plans with the annual budgets as stepping
stones to achieving growth targets. Its
government said its robust budgets had delivered
196 projects in 12 national “key economic
areas”, created 437,000 jobs and achieved 6.3
per cent expansion in Gross Domestic Product
since 2009. Indonesia’s budgets are components
of five-year plans that have made it South-East
Asia’s largest economy and the third fastest
growing G-20 economy with a per capita GDP of
$82,762, the world’s third highest, according to
the IMF, based on certain projected data.
Buhari should begin by appointing upright
technocrats as ministers in charge of finance
and national planning and re-professionalising
the Budget Office. The office should be
insulated from political influence, while
approved capital budgets should be scrupulously
implemented. Emphasis should be on
infrastructure, education, health, institutional
reforms and job creation.
Beginning from 2016, national budgets should
eliminate waste and loopholes for corruption,
while budget implementation and monitoring
agencies should be upgraded and strengthened.

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Lagos-Badagry Expressway of agony


SEPTEMBER 23, 2015 : OUR READER
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Lagos-Badagry Expressway
The over 55-year-old and about 60-kilometre
Lagos-Badagry Expressway is one amongst the
several Federal Government roads in the country.
With the euphoria of its award for reconstruction
and expansion by the Lagos State Government to
a 10-lane dual carriageway with light rail public
transport on the median and a Bus Rapid Transit
System that will transform the road to a super
highway, expectations were high, everyone kept
watch, immeasurable joy and happiness were in
the minds of the commuters and residents along
the route. But with the growing rate of
despondency by residents and commuters going
by what can be described as a snail’s pace at
which the construction work is going, one will
assume, and perhaps, certainly conclude that the
road will never be completed.
The major construction companies (Julius Berger
Nigeria Plc and China Civil Engineering
Construction Company) having started the first
phase in 2010 from Orile to Mile 2, several
demolitions took place, churches and banks
relocated, shops were brought down, market
places were affected and even residential
buildings were not spared. But after two years of
the uncompleted construction of the first stage,
yet the second phase of the construction started
in 2012 from Mile 2 to Abule-Ado with
demolitions as in the first stage.
Amazingly, the third phase of the construction
started with demolitions in April 2015 from Abule-
Ado to Afromedia junction. Suffice it to state
here that both the first and second stages of the
construction have not been completed yet the
continued demolitions. Sadly, everything is still
like a mirage, little wonder what keeps ringing in
the minds of the affected and yet to be affected
buildings is: When will it be if it will be ever
completed with the slow pace at which the
project is going?
Many will begin to assure themselves that the
work will never be completed as the work has
just been on one section of the road even after
five years of construction without a definite
completion of any part, though the beautiful
tents built by the construction companies in
different locations along the road, the presence
of caterpillars, cranes and trucks will give little
assurance on the possibility of completing the
road.
It is pitiable that residents, commuters, and
commercial vehicle drivers on this axis spend
manhours in the constant traffic jams that
characterise this chaotic route as a result of
potholes on it.
Quality time that would have been used for more
productivity in the workplaces and intimacy at
homes are now being wasted consequent to bad
road, perhaps and most certainly, the worst
international road in the world.
In fact, as early as 6:30am, several supposed
commuters are already trekking especially from
Iyana Iba to Ojo military barracks; they trek
several kilometres also when returning from
work. This they have resorted to not because of
their inability to pay the outrageous transport
fares but certainly because it is now the fastest
means to get to their work stations in the
morning and their homes in the evening all as a
result of the potholes on this hectic route.
Especially on a rainy day, suspense is high, anger
accumulates, stress is continuous and transport
fares are exorbitant from commercial vehicle
drivers to the detriment of the public.
Following the installation of street-lights in a few
kilometres of the yet-to-be-completed second
stage even when the uncompleted first stage has
no street lights, it has dawned on most people
that the road project is more like a political
gimmick.
It is a pity that even the construction companies
have been infected with this politics. A hitherto
journey of 30 minutes now takes between two
and four hours.
Ejime Obinna,
Ojo, Lagos, myadvantage2010@yahoo.
com. 08024538088

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Saraki at CCT


SEPTEMBER 23, 2015 : OUR READER
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The significance of Senate President Bukola
Saraki’s appearance at the Code of Conduct
Tribunal on Tuesday to answer charges of
criminal non-compliance with the requirements of
the law on asset declaration must not be lost on
Nigerians.
First, our institutions must be respected,
especially when such institutions are created and
established by our constitution.
I am glad that in spite of all the diversionary
tactics and the very strange and illogical
arguments, we have returned to the place where
we started, namely that the sanctity of the
jurisdiction of the Code of Conduct Tribunal as
the only judicial body empowered by our laws to
hear matters concerning asset declaration has
been established.
Second, the notion that some people are
untouchable must be debunked if we are to run
a proper democracy. The law is no respecter of
any person.
Third, it is important to note that Saraki remains
innocent until his guilt is proved and this proof
must be in line with the standard of proof in
criminal matters, namely beyond reasonable
doubt. So, let nobody delude himself by passing
a guilty verdict on the man, even before his trial
commences.
It is one thing to make allegations and another
thing entirely to prove such allegations.
Fourth, the Tribunal must guarantee that the trial
is free and fair. The Tribunal must be firm in the
discharge of its constitutional functions. It must
not allow itself to be intimidated by anybody. It
must also not allow itself to be swayed by the
staccato of political voices flowing from both
sides of the divide.
Justice must not only be done but must
manifestly be seen to have been done.
Onyebuchi Ememanka,
Aguda, Surulere,
Lagos State

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